24 thoughts on “I even cleaned up the URL for glasspusher

  1. I know we hate hate hate the FNYT, but this one's got some spectacular photography

    Dr. Nolan, a geophysicist, saw a grid of tracks left by heavy vehicles involved in recent seismic testing for oil and gas exploration in an area called Point Thomson. The tracks, several hundred yards apart, were as regular as a checkerboard and ran across the landscape just outside of the refuge.

    A similar dense grid may soon cover some of the refuge itself, perhaps beginning as early as December, if seismic testing starts under a plan to sell leases for oil and gas exploration that was approved by Congress last year and that is strongly opposed by environmental and conservation groups. The northern part of the refuge, 1.5 million acres of the Arctic coastal plain known as the 1002 Area, is thought to overlie billions of barrels of oil and gas.

  2. Verily, I say, if you have trimmed the URL for the least of my brothers or sisters, you have trimmed it for me

    1. “And when you trim URLs, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to trim URLs standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by others."

  3. Ju$t look at tho$e track$. But dang, with tRump's EPA we can't make a killing investing in tundra reclamation bidnesses, since tRump won't require any of that nanny state sillysauce.

  4. Sue Natali, an ecologist at Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts who studies Arctic tundra and permafrost, said that depressions, even shallow ones, can have cascading effects. “The ground sinks, so it gets wetter,” she said. Since water carries and conducts heat, the land thaws more and then sinks more. “The impact can last for a very long time,” she said.

    “The issue is, you’re causing connections and movements of water across the landscape that perhaps weren’t happening before,” Dr. Natali added.

    Well, shit.

    1. Tracked equipment churns up the soil terribly, too. It can't exactly be rehabilitated. There are still scars all over the Mojave Desert from Patton's tank exercises in WWII.

  5. OT, but anybody here ever been to New Zealand? Is it worth the trip? Yes yes fjords and volcanoes, but what do you do for the rest of the week?

    1. My bride and I have been several times – and found something better each time. North Island, Auckland is great, and that is where you'll land. Stop first in Hawaii, non-stop ducks giggly. From Auckland head north along the west coast to their wine country. Then head south along the east coast to the Bay of Plenty. Then continue south to catch an Art Deco amazement in Napier. Then head to Rotorua, Lake Taupo, gardens in Hamilton,, Hobbiton, and back to Aukland. Figure two weeks at least. Catch South Island on next trip.

          1. I have some dear friends in Tauranga. Wish I could get down there, and it's even less likely they will be able to return to the States.

          2. I think they check the landing gear wells more carefully these days, and like you said, nonstop would suck bad enough in the cabin!

          3. In time, no doubt. 'specially if this smoke keeps up. gasp
            To the detriment of any future travel plans, any surplus Ameros will be going into making my house habitable for an old person. Wider doorways into the bedrooms and a handicap accessible bathroom at the least. A ramp down into the 1/2 step lower living room, too.

          4. Having just spent two months on crutches, I can sympathize. Losing your mobility, even partially, is miserable.

          5. I aged my carcass prematurely, what with all the athletic pursuits I wasn't particularly well-suited for, not to mention the backbreaking work I did as a young. I can't count on both hands the number of ortho surgeries I've endured, and several more on the horizon. I'd be kidding myself to think I'll remain upright for the duration. If I intend to stay here, there is much improvement to be done, and I'll have to borrow to do it.

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